Sandalwood Incense Meaning & History

The History

The bible refers to Sandalwood as one of the most exquisite scents and is thought to be a tree that God planted.

Its origins can be linked to mediaeval India and Egypt (3100 BCE), and its Sanskrit name, Chandan, means "holy wood for burning incense."

It has long been used as a cosmetic therapy and is said to have been derived from the Latin word "Candere," which means to shine or glow. Sandalwood paste is spread to the temple during religious rites and is used to honour the almighty in Hindu Ayurveda and Vedic science.

What the Religions Say

In many religions around the world, sandalwood, which is made from the wood of the Santalum tree, is revered as one of the most sacred substances.

From the dawn of civilization, sandalwood, one of the most precious woods in the world, has been used to make incense sticks. Its characteristic, warm, woodsy, and enduring scent has a number of advantages.

Even though the sandalwood tree has many diverse components, the blossoms are the part that is most frequently picked and used. For instance, the essential oil's anti-inflammatory characteristics are frequently utilised in holistic medicine, and some studies are even examining its effects on tumours and other disorders.

The wood can be crushed into a powder form and used to the skin as a cleanser. Rose oil or camphor can be added to the powder for cosmetic dentistry.

Essential oils, that are frequently employed in religious ceremonies, aromatherapy, and conventional medicine, are abundant in sandalwood.

The majority of the goods supplied in the United States and Europe presently originate from Australian sandalwood, which is not on the endangered species list like Indian sandalwood.

Sandalwood is linked to magic for prosperity and security, in addition to cleansing and purifying, in different contemporary Pagan practices.

Since ancient times, sandalwood has been employed in sacred settings. It can be found in Buddhist and Muslim ceremonies, and the Egyptians utilized it together with other fragrant plants in their burial practices.

Its antibacterial qualities make it a vital component of folk medicine in China and Tibet. Sandalwood is carved into complex ornaments for temples and residences in India, as well as used to make miniatures and mala jewellery.

Furthermore, a paste that can be applied to the foreheads of worshippers in Hindu temples occasionally is made.

One of the most common treatments in the Ayurvedic medical practice is still sandalwood oil. Many different diseases are self-treated with it by Asians and Arabs. It primarily appears in detergent and fragrance in Europe, where it once played a significant part in aromatherapy.

Folklore & Magic of Sandalwood

There are many mystical uses for sandalwood, and they are likely to differ according to the religious organisation you're talking about. It is linked to healing and purification in many modern Paganism traditions.

Sandalwood paste is frequently used in Hindu rituals to dedicate ritual objects prior to rituals. Sandalwood is considered by Buddhists to be one of the lotus' sacred smells and can be utilised to maintain one's connection to the outside universe while the mind is wandering during meditation.

Sandalwood is linked to the seventh chakra, often known as the root chakra, located at the bottom of the spine in chakra work.

The incense can be burned to address problems with self-identity, sustainability and safety, and confidence.

The sandalwood tree's real wood is occasionally combined with other woods or resins, like myrrh or frankincense, and burned as incense in some Neopagan traditions.

Several varieties of folk magic connect it to magic for both commerce and defence. You can write your intention on a bit of sandalwood and then set it in a hearth to fire it as another way to employ the wood in spellwork.

Your intention or request will be taken to the sky on the prevailing smoke as your sandalwood burns.

 Benefits 

  • Anytime anxiety enters your balanced life, you might require an energy cleanse. This could occur after a trying workday or on certain gloomy days when you don't feel well. When that occurs, find a serene setting, light some sandalwood incense, meditate, and recite encouraging mantras. 
  • Your spirit is lifted by the calming Sandalwood scent, which strengthens those affirmations in your life. 
  • As the perfume of sandalwood offers a calm and stabilising protection for your soul and raises your downcast spirit, you might also apply it during yoga to correct your chakras.

Why Brahmas Sandalwood incense sticks are Different

Our sticks are made using 100% natural substances. Our 100% hand-rolled incense sticks are a means to provide our women artisans with a better livelihood and priceless smiles.

We do not use Charcoal as a burning agent. We use ethically sourced organic wood powder to aid the burning process.

This is 100% eco friendly and does not give out any black smoke.

Do give our Brahmas Sandalwood incense sticks a try and leave your review below. I guarantee you that you won’t be disappointed!

Check out our discounted selection of 6 different incense sticks which will help you cleanse your aura and bring in positive energy.

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